Letter from the President

Dear Fellow Adhesion Society Members,

Thank you to all whom made our 40th annual meeting a great celebration of our Society’s history and our ongoing pursuit of adhesion science knowledge. In particular, we are most grateful to Prof. Jim Wightman who joined us after a long absence, Prof. Tony Kinloch and Don Hunston who continue in regular attendance, and Prof. Mark Foster who provided detail and background on the very beginning of the Society. They all represented the select group of founders/early leaders of our Society. We celebrated our 40th Anniversary with a grand party on Sunday evening that was most enjoyable. The photo booth and sketch artists surely captured some artifacts of the evening’s festivities. Many thanks to Malinda Armstrong and the Executive Committee for putting this together after our offsite venue canceled. The meeting itself was quite well attended with approximately 250 registrations and was preceded by another very well attended Short Course organized by Prof. David Dillard. So congratulations to our program chair Prof. Kai-Tak Wan, Divisions, Short Course instructors, and session organizers for putting together such a great meeting. One of the program’s many highlights was the Award for Excellence in Adhesion Science Symposium sponsored by 3M in honor of Prof. Tom McCarthy. The session, organized and chaired by Prof. Al Crosby, provided a showcase of Tom’s influence and achievements in our field. Our meeting site, St. Petersburg, offered a well-deserved break from winter weather and offered many of the amenities we have come to expect from a host city. The one hour lunch break continues to be a challenge as restaurants really have to be close by for this to work. The hotel did step in and offer preordered meals and the planning meetings on Monday and Tuesday featured complimentary buffet lunch. The Executive Committee and the Program Chair continue to work on streamlining the increasingly packed program that is often in flux up to the start of the program.  

        During the Society’s business meeting we announced several changes and additions that were made by the Executive Committee starting in 2017. Briefly, these changes are a reduction in the membership fee to $40, addition of an annual fun 5k run/walk, member only access to the most recent two years of proceedings, and shortened terms for Division Officers. These changes were made to encourage membership when unable to attend, increase fun and comrade, avoid public disclosure prior to publication conflicts, and to make it easier to recruit Division Officers, respectively. The terms for Division officers is now reduced to 1 year with automatic promotion of the Vice-Chair to Chair with the prior Chair becoming the immediate past Chair. Thus, the Divisions only have to elect one position every year. The Division Office of Secretary-Treasurer is now optional as typically the position is not needed. If you have questions or comments about these changes please let us know.  

        It is with great sadness that I inform you of the passing of a former President, Program Chair, Fellow of the Society, and long term contributor, Ray Dickie. Ray passed away in April at his home after a brief illness. Ray made significant contributions to the use of adhesives and adhesion science at Ford Motor Co and then as a Consultant. He made an impact on all of us who knew him and interacted with him. He will be missed. Also, I would like to reflect on recent passing of Prof Kenneth Johnson, and Carl Dhalquist. Prof. Johnson, the J in the JKR theory, had a significant role in the development of the field of contact mechanics and its use in addressing a wide variety of industrial problems that included adhesion. The Society awarded him our Award for Excellence in Adhesion Science in 2002. Carl is famous for the Dhalquist criterion and other efforts within 3M that is credited with bringing tape and PSA’s generally out of the dark ages and into the field of scientific study that it is today. Please join me in remembering and honoring the contributions and personality of these three great contributors to the field of adhesion.  

2018 WCARP VI: It will be our privilege to host the sixth World Congress on Adhesion and Related Phenomena in 2018 along with our Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA. This is a global adhesion conference that rotates between continents every four years. We will follow our current meeting format being organized by Prof. Joelle Frechette of John Hopkins University with the addition of organization from an International Organizing Committee (IOC) that will provide session organization from nine adhesion focused Societies in South America, Asia, and Europe. Thus, we anticipate that this will be a large meeting that possibly runs through Thursday afternoon rather than our usual noon on Wednesday. We hosted this meeting last in 2002 and attendance was over 350, our biggest meeting ever. Thus, we have much to look forward to and much to organize so please provide Joelle and the IOC your best efforts. One highlight we are pleased to announce now is the selection of Prof. Ray Pearson of Lehigh University as the winner of the 2018 Award for Excellence in Adhesion! He has graciously accepted this nomination and we can look forward to another superb Award Symposium. Thank you for responding to the brief survey. We continue to seek your input to make your meeting and Society better each year. My dear members we have an exciting meeting to look forward to in a beautiful venue. See you in San Diego!  

Member Spotlight

2017 Award for Excellence in Adhesion Science (sponsored by 3M)

David Yarusso (3M), and Greg Schueneman (US Forest Service) presented the 2017 Award for Excellence in Adhesion Science sponsored by 3M to Professor Tom McCarty, Professor of Polymer Science and Engineering at University of Massachusetts Amherst, for his “For his pioneering research in elucidating mechanisms of surface chemistry and wetting of polymers”.

The 39th The 40th Annual Meeting began with a special session honoring Prof. Tom McCarty’s contributions with talks by Christopher Stafford (NIST) on "Functional Group Quantification on Ultrathin Polymer Coatings and Membranes", followed by Atsushi Hozumi (AIST) who discussed "Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Surfaces Showing Self-healing Properties", Daniel Flagg (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) on “Chemistry-Property Relashionships of “MQ”: From Sol to Silica” and concluded with Wei Chen (Mount Holyoke College) on “Hydrophilization of Fluoropolymers and Silicones”.

Professor McCarty, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, has published more than 150 papers on modification of surfaces in which wetting mechanisms have played an important part. Thirty of his papers have been cited more than 100 times, including one of the most highly cited papers in Langmuir (2000) entitled “Ultrahydrophobic Surfaces. Effects of Topography Length Scales on Wettability” cited more than 1200 times. Other impactful publications include: “Ultrahydrophobic and ultralyophobic surfaces: some comments and examples,” “Molecular monolayers and films”, “Ultrahydrophobic polymer surfaces prepared by simultaneous ablation of polypropylene and sputtering of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) using radio frequency plasma” and “The lotus effect explained: Two reasons why two length scales of topography are important”. Undoubtedly, Prof. McCarty has been one of the most productive and impactful surface scientists over the past three decades, with significant contributions in the understanding of wetting phenomena as well as numerous other fundamental and applied topics. His most recent interests include silicones, the surface chemistry of inorganic materials, and how to manipulate wetting to create new materials. “A Surprise from 1954: Siloxane Equilibration. Is a Simple, Robust, and Obvious Polymer Self-Healing Mechanism” proposed a new methodology of real-self healing system design. This is a clear example on how Tom has been able to combine “wetting phenomena” and “silicone chemistry” to advance adhesion science and technology. He also attains such a high citation rate as he believes in public discussion of the implications of his and others work. His papers “How Cassie and Wenzel Were Wrong” and “Wetting 101” being prime examples.

Additionally, Prof. McCarty is one of the distinguished members of our adhesion community. He has made other numerous and deep contributions to adhesion science over the years. The 40th Annual Meeting began with a special session honoring Prof. Tom McCarty’s contributions with talks by Christopher Stafford (NIST) on "Functional Group Quantification on Ultrathin Polymer Coatings and Membranes", followed by Atsushi Hozumi (AIST) who discussed "Superhydrophobic and Superhydrophilic Surfaces Showing Self-healing Properties", Daniel Flagg (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) on “Chemistry-Property Relashionships of “MQ”: From Sol to Silica” and concluded with Wei Chen (Mount Holyoke College) on “Hydrophilization of Fluoropolymers and Silicones”.

Professor McCarty, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, has published more than 150 papers on modification of surfaces in which wetting mechanisms have played an important part. Thirty of his papers have been cited more than 100 times, including one of the most highly cited papers in Langmuir (2000) entitled “Ultrahydrophobic Surfaces. Effects of Topography Length Scales on Wettability” cited more than 1200 times. Other impactful publications include: “Ultrahydrophobic and ultralyophobic surfaces: some comments and examples,” “Molecular monolayers and films”, “Ultrahydrophobic polymer surfaces prepared by simultaneous ablation of polypropylene and sputtering of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) using radio frequency plasma” and “The lotus effect explained: Two reasons why two length scales of topography are important”. Undoubtedly, Prof. McCarty has been one of the most productive and impactful surface scientists over the past three decades, with significant contributions in the understanding of wetting phenomena as well as numerous other fundamental and applied topics. His most recent interests include silicones, the surface chemistry of inorganic materials, and how to manipulate wetting to create new materials. “A Surprise from 1954: Siloxane Equilibration. Is a Simple, Robust, and Obvious Polymer Self-Healing Mechanism” proposed a new methodology of real-self healing system design. This is a clear example on how Tom has been able to combine “wetting phenomena” and “silicone chemistry” to advance adhesion science and technology. He also attains such a high citation rate as he believes in public discussion of the implications of his and others work. His papers “How Cassie and Wenzel Were Wrong” and “Wetting 101” being prime examples.

Additionally, Prof. McCarty is one of the distinguished members of our adhesion community. He has made other numerous and deep contributions to adhesion science over the years.